Blog

What heritage teachers were doing on October 3rd

Learning about big ideas is great.  So is seeing and hearing what teachers did on Wednesday morning, so that’s what we’ve done here.  Fourteen awesome participants, from the East and West coast, from the north and from the south, all sent me what they did in their heritage classrooms on Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018– the only goal being to share their ideas with you, their colleagues (and future colleagues).  One teacher below teaches three different levels of Heritage Spanish on the same day, so she sent three lesson plans at different levels, which is very useful to see.

I won’t include a lot of commentary here because I believe the snapshots shared below speak for themselves (plus, I want the college students I’ll be teaching to try and make their own observations 🙄).  But suffice it say that ya’ll be kickin’ some heritage butt out there.  So without further ado, here’s what I received.  If you want to view in Google photos click here.

If you find this “One Day” post helpful, click “like” at the end!

one-day-pic-71

one-day-pic-81

one-day-pic-31

one-day-pic-17

one-day-pic-21

one-day-pic-41

one-day-pic-61

one-day-pic-51

one-day-pic-91

one-day-pic-101

one-day-pic-111

one-day-pic-131

one-day-pic-121

one-day-pic-161

one-day-pic-151

 

one-day-pic-141

 

One Day pic #17.jpg

“But they already speak Spanish” – In defense of heritage language programs

Are heritage language classes worthwhile?  Don’t “those students already speak the language”?

I had a colleague tell me yesterday that some of her grad school classmates feel that their heritage language tracks are being threatened, because administrators are questioning whether or not they are learning anything by taking a language class in a language that they already speak.  We also commented how thankful we feel to not be in that place, and that we have a supportive administration.  Our program has shown growth over the last few years.

It’s a valid question.  So, what makes a heritage program worthwhile?  And what qualities should a good heritage program contain?

In two points, I believe that a heritage program is worthwhile if……

It is moving the students up the proficiency pyramid.

General (L2) world language programs start at the Novice level and (hopefully) produce Intermediate speakers.  Heritage programs will receive students somewhere in the Intermediate range and push them into the Advanced range, and probe them at the Superior level.  All high school students have gains to be had in proficiency in a non-English language, whether heritage or non-heritage students.  Sure, heritage students “already speak the language”, but I guarantee that 99.999% of them aren’t Advanced-High or Superior speakers.  There is always progress to be had, always floors to be added to the house, and always language skills to be acquired.

If you’re a Spanish teacher, look at a recent writing sample of a student of mine here at the beginning of the year.

SNS writing sample

There are gender errors, spelling errors, and a general lack of breadth of response that I would not attribute to lack of interest (great student here!), but lack of confidence in fleshing out thoughts in Spanish.  Why would we pass up an opportunity to leave the Spanish of our students at this level and not build it and enrich it?

It is expanding the breadth of cultural knowledge of your students.

I dislike the idea of “testing out of a language” if the possibility of participation in (or creation of) a heritage program exists.  Language classes are – or at least should be – about much more than learning words and grammatical structures.  Those things are a means to an end- and we can actually accomplish that “end” in heritage classes!  A heritage program should expand the width and breadth of knowledge of culture, society, history, literature, current events, and arts of your heritage students.  

Take José, a heritage student in 9th grade whose parents are from Mexico.

  • Does José know anything about why the population of Argentina is primarily white European?
  • Has José ever had a pen pal or Skype conversation with teenagers in Spain?
  • Does José know much about the Mayans, Aztecs, or Incas?
  • Does José know who Rafael Trujillo was?  
  • Does José know why there are so many words from Arabic in Spanish?
  • Has José ever listened to Natalia Lafourcade, Ruben Blades, and songs like “Latinoamérica”?

The answer to all the above is mostly “no”.  Heritage students could be pushed to take French or Mandarin to fulfill a language requirement – and that’s fantastic.  But let’s not believe that there isn’t plenty of room for expanding cultural, historical, social, and artistic horizons for our heritage students in their home language!  Let’s not scratch the language requirements for them.

I understand that school districts have to apportion their funds wisely and be careful to build sustainable programs.  But if you have a good number of heritage students who are interested in improving their language skills and expanding their cultural knowledge in their own home language, don’t add sections of Spanish 2 and 3.  Create separate classes for them to progress linguistically and culturally.

If you think this post was helpful, give it a like below!  I’d like honest feedback.

A one-day snapshot of heritage language teaching: October 3rd

As language educators, we understand that showing is better than telling.  In early October, I have the opportunity to give a crash course on heritage language teaching to student teachers at a local state university.  I have lots of my own content planned for my evening with them, but I would like to showcase a little bit of what all of you other amazing heritage language teachers are doing out there.

Remember that book series “A Day In The Life of ”?  A couple of days ago, I caught sight of the book “A Day In the Life of Japan” on my bookshelf, and an idea struck me.  The idea was this:  Pick one day soon, and ask heritage teachers to send me a brief summary, with an accompanying visual, of whatever they are doing in their heritage lang class on that day.  My plan would be to present everything together here on my website (possibly a Google Slides presentation – we’ll see I get!) and have it for my workshop for the student teachers.  But all of you would get to see it also right here on your favorite website, http://www.senordineroman.com.  We can all have a one-day snapshot of what heritage language teachers are all doing on that day and get ideas from one another!

Want to participate?  ¡Qué bueno!  Here are the details.

  • Send me a (1) brief summary (a short paragraph will do), and (2) a visual of whatever you do in your heritage lang classroom on Wednesday, October 3rd.
  • You can send it ahead of time, or send me a sum-up after you’re done teaching on that day.  Send to ccashman@chiarts.org.
  • You could put it on a Powerpoint slide like below in the sample pictures, or just send me the info in the body of an email and/or an attached photo or video (or YouTube link), and I can organize it.
  • You can include as much ID information as you feel comfortable with, knowing that it could be shared with a wide audience. See sample pictures below.

[ Sample submissions ] 

Like I said, this idea of mine is pretty fresh, so if any of you have any questions or advice, please let me know and I can refine the plan!

Why don’t you leave a comment below if you believe you’d like to be part of this – and also share it with your other heritage language teaching friends?  If you respond, then I’ll hit you up before, during, and after Oct 3rd to remind you about it and then get your sum-up.

Thanks for any of you who are willing to participate!

Heritage goals, heritage teachers, and random ideas – Day #2 from June 2018 workshop at Univ of Texas

Amigos, I don’t know about you, but I need something to distract my mind from Trump, Kim Jong-Un, and Dennis Rodman in a MAGA hat all landing in Singapore to chit-chat for a few days.  To get our minds off of that, how about we get an update from Day 2 of the annual heritage language teaching conference from the University of Texas at Austin?

Today’s entry will consist of (1) the what and the who of heritage language teaching; (2) a random smattering of ideas and resources that were brought up at the conference; and (3) a few things stated at the conference that I disagree with.  Comment your thoughts below!

Heritage teaching, heritage teachers

The main topic of the day was talking about the needs of a heritage course, and how heritage teachers need to be equipped.  Powerpoint can be found here.

These should be the main, overarching goals for a heritage language course.  Notice how much of it is affective:

HL goals

And the core competencies that heritage educators need….

HL teacher competencies

There’s so much that could be said about all of those things above.  Heritage teachers have to be aware of how to build up their students’ identities, approach their curriculum with an additive approach (versus “replacing” the Spanish they speak), and foster a love for literacy in the heritage language.

So what are some ways to do that?  Below are some things that were shared at the conference.

Potpourri of resources and ideas

Beginning of the year surveys are very important for collecting info about why your heritage students are in that class.  It’s particularly important because you can pick up on inferiority complexes they may have about their language ability or cultural identity.  The teacher can include elements in the course to directly address these through planned conversations about U.S. Spanish and reading pieces about Latino identity.

 “Radio Ambulante” is a podcast that we as heritage teachers must start using in our classroom.  It’s a subsidiary of NPR, but all in Spanish, and based on the lives and stories of people in the Spanish-speaking world.  Now, here’s an amazing thing:  Radio Ambulante’s Vimeo channel runs the subtitles to all the podcasts as videos.  Check it out.

Radio Ambulante

“The Abuelos Project”:  This year-long project gets students grounded in their culture via a series of interviews and conversations they need to have with an elderly person in their (heritage) community.  See info about it here, on 18 slides.  This seems a bit ambitious for my classroom, but I think a modified version of it would be in order.  Aren’t our students’ communities and families a source of learning sitting right under our noses that we often ignore?

Photography and presentation of Hispanic presence in the community.  The presentational mode is the most difficult mode of communication that our heritage students struggle with.  One project idea that was shared was having heritage students go out and photograph the Hispanic presence of their community, and then doing some sort of presentation with it.  One professor shared that her college students did this and presented it at a community event.  What a way to have students document the barrio.  

Teaching accents:  Advice was given to focus on diacritic accents and frequently used words in Spanish that carry accents, and that should take care of about 75% of accented words in Spanish.  A professor stated that she doesn’t see that teaching explicit accentuation rules helps students.  Good point to ponder.  I am thinking more about how little my explicit teaching about language seems to make its way into my students’ actual language use, although I do have some ideas cooking about how to address that next year.   Not sure if I’m ready to give this up though, especially since I’ve boiled the topic down to a single-page flow chart after teaching the concepts of llana, aguda, and esdrújula.

Authentic text about Mexican identity: A teacher at the conference mentioned that Octavio Paz, in his book “El Laberinto De La Soledad”, writes a lot about Mexican identity.  I’ve been perusing some parts here in the book (gotta love all the PDF’s of novels on the Internet), and do find that he unpacks a lot of elements of Mexican identity in chapter 2 entitled “Máscaras Mexicanas”.  Some parts might be a little advanced.

Octavio Paz extract

Three points of disagreement

I was debating whether or not to make mention of this, but I think it’s worthwhile to start bringing up some interesting points where heritage teachers may differ:

“Use translated materials”:  Some presenters at the conference promoted the use of materials that have English and Spanish versions available, which would be resources like “Cajas De Cartón” or “The House On Mango Street”.  I absolutely grant that texts like these are excellent for the identity element.  Having English versions of texts available could help literacy development.  However, I strongly believe that we as heritage teachers need to steer away from translated texts and find authentic texts for our heritage students.  ACTFL encourages us to do that with L2 students; how much more with heritage students, who already struggle with an ‘authentic’ sense of self?  I find many translated pieces to be really rough to read through.  Can we start compiling a list of authentic literature that would be good for us to use, and perhaps hang it on COERLL’s “Resources” page?

I’ll start:  “La Mesa: Historias De Nuestra Gente”.  This is fantastic.  I’ve used several chapters from this, but I’m thinking of asking my school to purchase copies of this and just make it a whole unit.  What else is out there?

La Mesa image

“ACTFL doesn’t provide a good framework for heritage teaching.”  Although it is true (to my knowledge) that ACTFL hasn’t laid out specific official guidance for heritage course design, I do believe that everything that heritage teachers need to know does fit within the 5 C’s— albeit different elements within each “C”.  Also, I must say that knowledge of ACTFL proficiency levels are incredibly informative for the heritage teacher, as I have written about here and here.

“Non-Hispanic students from dual-immersion schools are not heritage students.”  At my high school, I have always placed White students that come from K-8 dual immersion schools into my heritage classes, and all (with the exception of one) have done very well there and would have missed out on a lot had they been placed in a regular language classroom.  Dual immersion schools are going to become more and more common (Chicago Public Schools has the vision to have 30 by the year 2020), and I think that high school and college language programs shouldn’t overlook non-Hispanic students who have successfully acquired a language naturally in a dual immersion context.  Linguistically, they are HLL’s in my opinion.  They may not be HLL’s based on family and home culture, which Valdés has always included in her definition of a HLL (see here). But considering the amount of hours of their most formative years they spend in the context of the heritage culture in a K-8 context, I would think that they qualify in some way – at least for purposes of language placement.

And that concludes the report from Austin, Texas.  Hopefully this will spark some great ideas for your heritage classroom– perhaps even better ideas than those that will come from Singapore this week!

Starting a heritage language program – takeaways from Day #1 at Univ of TX June 2018

It’s indoor season in Austin, Texas right now due to the insanely hot temperatures it reaches in the summertime here.  There’s no better time of the year in Texas than to sit in an air conditioned room with other heritage language teachers for… a heritage language teachers’ conference.  I wanted to pass along some of my main takeaways from this years’ heritage language teachers conference sponsored by the Center for Open Educational Resources for Language Learning (COERLL) at the University of Texas at Austin.  The main focus this year is starting up a heritage language program.

STARTING A HERITAGE LANGUAGE PROGRAM

Teachers all across the United States are being asked to “start a heritage program” and are wondering where to start.  Today’s workshop was for that issue.  First of all, here is a link to the very thorough Powerpoint that professor Gabriela Zapata shared with us today, entitled “Heritage Language Program Development: Administrative and Pedagogical Aspects”.  I’m also going to boil it down below, focusing on what I felt were the main ingredients, and also including my own personal takeaways and reflections that I got.

#1 – Use backwards design to build your heritage program. This is something we are accustomed to as educators, and it is no different when starting a heritage program.  Identify your desired results, and even craft a mission statement for your program.  With that, you can explain your goals to stakeholders and get people excited about the general direction you are giving it.

Personal takeaway:  I never designed a mission statement for the heritage track I developed at my school.  Going to do that!

Personal input and experience with this:  Being acquainted with ACTFL proficiency levels is important for doing this, despite the notion out there that proficiency levels and assessments like OPI are ideal for non-native speakers.  Not true.  For next school year, I actually established a benchline proficiency level of “Intermediate-Mid” for students entering my SNS 1 classroom.  I can honestly say that this year’s placement testing procedure in May allowed me to place some incoming freshmen into the general language track that, in previous years, I probably would have enrolled in my heritage classroom – and then they would have struggled.

#2 – Establish curricular priorities. What do you want your students to do with the language?  Do you want them to be prepared for Spanish in a blue-collared work environment in the United States, or do you think that students should be prepared to communicate with the wider Spanish-speaking world outside of the United States?  Will your goals be differentiated for different students?  That will influence your curriculum.

Different perspective:  La Profesora Zapata encouraged us to center our curriculum around the predominant home culture of our students, for the purpose of grounding them in their identity and building them up in it.  I have to ponder on this, because I feel that I took a different approach in building the curriculum for the heritage track at our school.  Although definitely including elements of what she is saying, I started from the standpoint that my students are familiar with – and prideful of – their own culture, and so my objective has been to expose them to the wider array of Spanish-speaking cultures that they aren’t familiar with.  I think the decision revolves around secure or insecure the heritage students in your community feel about their identity.  That seems to vary from place to place in the United States.

#3 – Gather resources. We spent a lot of time going through some possible resources.  Textbooks are out of vogue, and they deserve to be.  There is a link below (screenshots included) that is a good guide for choosing resources for heritage programs.

www.espanolabierto.org

espanol abierto photo 1

You’ve got to visit that SpinTX Video archive.  It’s amazing.

Heritage Spanish screenshot

The website above, https://heritagespanish.coerll.utexas.edu/,  is indispensable for finding resources for heritage classes.  That “Resources” tab has a lot of stuff.  And please do notice that there are heritage course syllabi posted on that link.  Wow – what more could you ask for!

Like I said, go through her Powerpoint to get the whole story of everything Profesora Zapata recommends, but these were the biggest elements I took away.

Second day of the conference is tomorrow morning.  If you found this worthwhile, give it a “like” here on WordPress.  I may post again with more insights collected!